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  • Robert Indiana - Special Edition of the Book of Love 13 ed. of 50 20x24in.
  • Love Robert Indiana 100x100cm ed. of 300 1995
  • Metamorphosis of Norma Jean (Marilyn Monroe) , 1996 Silkscreen Serigraph    35 x 35 in  88 x 88 cm Edition of 90 35 x 35 inches  89 x 89 cm  Pencil Numbered and Signed
  • Hope Sculpture - 2009 - 46x46x23cm 18x18x9in. Bronze - Numbered 1 of an edition of 9

Robert Indiana (born as Robert Clark, September 13, 1928) is an American artist associated with the Pop Art movement.

Robert Indiana was born in New Castle, Indiana and later relocated to Indianapolis where he graduated from Arsenal Technical High School. He moved to New York City in 1954 and joined the pop art movement, using distinctive imagery drawing on commercial art approaches blended with existentialism, that gradually moved toward what Indiana calls “sculptural poems”.
In 1962, Eleanor Ward’s Stable Gallery hosted Robert Indiana’s first New York solo exhibition. He has since enjoyed solo exhibitions at over 30 museums and galleries worldwide. Indiana’s works are in the permanent collections of numerous museums, including MOMA, NY, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Stedelijk Museum, Schiedam, The Netherlands; Carnegie Institute, Pittsburgh; Detroit Institute of Art, Michigan; Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Brandeis Museum, Waltham, Massachusetts; Albright-Knox Gallery of Art, Buffalo, New York; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, California, the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington D.C.; Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Los Angeles County Museum, California, among many others.

Indiana’s work often consists of bold, simple, iconic images, especially numbers and short words like EAT, HUG, and, his best example known as LOVE.

Indiana’s iconic work LOVE was first created for a Christmas card for the Museum of Modern Art in 1964 and later was included on an eight-cent United States Postal Service postage stamp in 1973, the first of their regular series of “love stamps.” Sculptural versions of the image have been installed at numerous American and international locations. In 1977 he created a Hebrew version with the four letter word Ahava (אהבה “love” in Hebrew) using Cor-ten steel, for the Israel Museum Art Garden in Jerusalem, Israel.

In 2008, Indiana created an image similar to his iconic LOVE (letters tacked two to a line, the letter “o” tilted on its side), but this time showcasing the word “HOPE,” and has donated all proceeds from the image to Democrat Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. A stainless steel sculpture of HOPE was unveiled outside Denver’s Pepsi Center during the 2008 Democratic National Convention.